Press

Five days with Mozart

Close-up: “Mozart Marathon”

Alexander Tsereteli (Musical Life #2, 2014)

In the five days of the marathon, coinciding, of course, with Mozart’s date of birth (January 27), a truly miraculous memorial was enacted: all his concertos for all instruments were performed.

Piano Concerto No. 14 in E-flat major, performed by Vyacheslav Gryaznov, was a revelation. We already knew a lot about this musician. He is a brilliant pianist and composer. The virtuosity and inventiveness of his transcriptions fascinate and enthrall. His piano performance during this marathon was bound to amaze. Anna Akhmatova wrote a wonderful poem: “Finally, you have said a word.” What happens in the world around us when loving words are spoken? It can only be revealed by a poetic word: “And suddenly the silence sang to you / and the twilight lit up by the radiant sun / and the world for that moment was transformed / and the taste of the wine changed in a strange way…” Let me assure the reader: the silence sang its song in the most natural of ways. The concerto that has been played and played again sounded completely new and fresh: slowly and eloquently, unhurried and with soulful tone. Composers’ readings are often characterized by generality, but in this case it was the beauty of detail that prevailed. An exceptional, almost forgotten [pianistic] culture in which all the rich textures are played out, and the hidden details are revealed in the succession of fingers and chords. And the focus is on all the tempi, whether slow or rapid.

The cadenza specifically written for this performance dazzled with its organic interweaving of the main themes of the piece, leaving you eager to hear it again and again. And once it had imparted all that was important, it somehow faded away, dissolving naturally and imperceptibly, without the pathos and agitation that tends to typify the transition to the orchestral coda. There can be no doubt that Vyacheslav Gryaznov is one of the great wonders of modern pianism.


Wissembourg 2013 reviews

Wissembourg_2013_RecitalWissembourg_Rhapsody


The creative works of Gryaznov – yet more dazzling pieces of music (Ukraine)

Yulia Lesina, Your Chance newspaper (2013)

On June 11 the Two Pianos piano duo (Elena Antonets and Lyudmila Skrynnik) was joined by musicologist Vitalina Gukova to perform a program entitled Jazz. Classic. Piano. on the stage of the regional philharmonic. They played to a full house. On the program was Dave Brubeck’s suite Points on Jazz, and, for the first time in Ukraine, Vyacheslav Gryaznov’s Rhapsody In Black on themes from George Gershwin’s opera Porgy and Bess. [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]And if Brubeck’s composition, with its recognizable rhythmic and melodic balm, penetrated the souls of the listeners, hearing the Rhapsody and Gryaznov’s creativity for the first time left the audience stunned. It was a huge event in the cultural life of the city. 31-year-old Vyacheslav Gryaznov is an exceptional artist from the Moscow Philharmonic, one of the brightest and most sought-after Russian pianists of his generation, and a composer of brilliant transcriptions of classical works that have gained popularity the world over. Gryaznov wrote Rhapsody In Black just over a year ago. It is dedicated to the memory of the famous Russian pianist Nikolai Petrov, who prophesied the young musician a bright future. Shortly before his death Petrov said this about the Rhapsody: “I believe that it is no exaggeration to say that this is an absolutely magnificent piece of work. It quite simply does not get any better than this – a composition brimming with virtuosity and explosive creativity.” Rhapsody In Black for two pianos was performed by Vyacheslav Gryaznov and the renowned pianist Alexander Gindin in Moscow. The recording and score were discovered by chance on the internet by pianist Elena Antonets. She notes that for them, as academic pianists, it was a piece of music of which they could only have dreamed.

At one in the morning the phone rang, and it was Lyudmila Skrynnik’s turn to study the score and admire the creativity of the virtuoso musician from Moscow. The Sumy-based pianists decided to write to the composer to express their admiration and their desire to perform the composition on stage in Sumy. Contrary to expectations, as musicians at this level have a very tight schedule, they received an answer from Gryaznov in which he thanked them for their courage and dedication and wished them good luck and enjoyment for the concert. As regards courage, he was right. This was the most difficult work performed by the Two Pianos duo (in spite of a repertoire including works by Sergei Rachmaninov and Alfred Schnittke): a piece characterized by profound complexity, virtuoso passages, intricate cadenzas, and an abundance of metrical changes at a rapid tempo.

Nevertheless, in the words of Elena and Lyudmila, working on the Rhapsody was fun. They had no desire to give up, as they wanted to share their discovery with their listeners. It must be noted that Rhapsody In Black is not a paraphrase on the themes of Gershwin’s legendary opera. It is an independent 42-minute work (of course, Gershwin’s red thread is woven into the musical fabric and is easily recognizable) in which the composer presents the listener with a continuation of the dramatic stories of life and love involving the disabled, legless Porgy and the beautiful Bess, which unfold on the streets of New York. A narrative of passion and fearlessness, cocaine, the lust for life, love and weakness, suffering and dreams, the eternal wrangle between body and soul, conversations between the two protagonists or with themselves and the listeners about eternal truths. Screams and whispers, the universal breath of the enamored, and tears of regret from the eyes of the weak-willed woman – all of this is encompassed in the jazz and classical rhythms.

In terms of contrast, depth of meaning, dramatic power, and range of expression, Gryaznov has gone beyond Gershwin, creating a work of art that, while influenced by Gershwin, is his very own. The drama of human existence [is more than a story of] poor black neighborhoods in the state of Carolina or New York. Everyone will understand that. I think Rhapsody in Black is set to enter the musical canon. Sumy residents now have yet more dazzling musical performances to look back on thanks to the Two Pianos piano duo and, personally, to the composer.[/spoiler]


24 Etudes by Chopin at the Kostroma Philharmonic Hall

Kostroma Philharmonic, Feb 2012

Epithets such as young, ambitious, uncompromising, and sometimes even stubborn are often used to describe the musicians of the modern age. However, the young and talented musicians of today have many other qualities. The audience at the Kostroma Philharmonic Hall on February 2 could discover this for themselves. They came to see the winner of some of the most prestigious international competitions and awards, an unparalleled musician from the Moscow State Philharmonic Society and professorial assistant at the Moscow State Conservatory named after Peter Tchaikovsky: the pianist Vyacheslav Gryaznov. [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”] The concert in Kostroma saw the performance of all 24 Etudes by the great Polish composer Fr?d?ric Chopin. Professional musicians and music lovers alike are well aware of the level of excellence a pianist must reach to perform the cycle in its entirety. Gryaznov left the audience spellbound, not only because of a performance of outstanding virtuosity, but also thanks to a distinct creative style and desire to produce his own interpretation of the Etudes, without imitation or reference to the musicians who preceded him. Gryaznov has a unique, fresh and sharp perception of these popular classical pieces. With intense thought and the finest of craftsmanship, the pianist infused the Chopin pieces with the widest range of emotions.
Vyacheslav Gryaznov’s concert in Kostroma was part of the Evenings at Steinway season. Kostroma became acquainted with the work of this promising pianist almost a year ago, when his own transcriptions of various pieces of classical music were performed in concert. Combining his concertizing with the writing of piano arrangements, Gryaznov has already gained a reputation as one of the most popular young composers in his field.
His performances are unhurried and harmonious, with no pathos or superficial gloss. And a particular deliberation, splendor, and elegance is instilled into the meaning of each sound. His performances seem to contain nothing that is peripheral or transient. Every sound, every meaning, every nuance is of the utmost importance. That is probably why his interpretations seem so heartfelt. I can say with complete confidence that, now that they are familiar with the work of Vyacheslav Gryaznov, concertgoers are sure to hurry back to his concerts in Kostroma again and again in future seasons.[/spoiler]


Rhapsody In Style

Elena Prokhorova, Musical Life #1 2012

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The well-known Russian pianist and arranger Vyacheslav Gryaznov presented his new composition to the public this season – Rhapsody In Black for piano and orchestra, on themes from George Gershwin’s opera Porgy and Bess. It was performed at Moscow’s Orchestrion Concert Hall by the composer and Pavel Kogan’s Moscow State Symphony Orchestra conducted by Alexey Shatsky. The Rhapsody was also performed by the composer and Alexander Ghindin in its two-piano version at a concert at the Tchaikovsky Hall. Gryaznov wrote this composition especially for the piano duo of Alexander Ghindin and Nikolai Arnoldovich Petrov. The premiere was scheduled for May 2011, but was unable to take place as planned because Petrov fell seriously ill. Following Petrov’s subsequent death, the composer dedicated the composition to him, as it was largely thanks to Petrov’s support that the Rhapsody was written. [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]Vyacheslav Gryaznov talks about composing the Rhapsody: “I had an intense desire to express my feelings about Gershwin’s great opera via piano and orchestra. But after writing a couple of pages and realizing that I was getting nowhere, I put it off for about a year.” Somehow, Nikolai Petrov found out about ??Gryaznov’s idea and asked him to write a two-piano version for his duo with Alexander Ghindin as they were about to play a Gershwin program. Highly impressed by Gryaznov’s previous arrangements and transcriptions, Petrov, with the composer’s consent, unhesitatingly put the composition that had yet to be written on the next season’s program! There was no turning back. Gryaznov could not let him down – he had to write it. The Rhapsody developed gradually and was sent to Petrov in chunks, each of which he welcomed with great enthusiasm and immediately began to learn. “He called almost every week,” says Gryaznov. “He asked how things were going, wanted more specific details about the performance, and was always very supportive. Without that personal contact, I could never have imagined how sincere and passionate this man was, how much respect he could give a musician much younger and less experienced than he was, and how much genuine and even youthful enthusiasm there was in his soul! It is difficult to say when and how this Rhapsody would have been written (and whether it would have been written at all) without Nikolai Petrov’s wholehearted participation.”

The finished composition was magnificent, stylish, and substantial (it lasts about 42 minutes). In my opinion, it is absolutely perfect with respect to the original. It was not intended as a paraphrase of hit tunes. The composer’s conspicuous originality is revealed here at its fullest. He has created a great dramaturgic composition with a very interesting, very personal and fresh idea. It is better if he tells you about it himself: “Gershwin’s opera is open-ended. So, the conclusion is in question. Porgy discovers that Bess, tempted by Sporting Life and drugs, has gone to New York. He harnesses his goat to a cart and, not knowing anything about New York except that it is very far away, sets off to rescue his beloved. Will he be able to get there at all – that is the big question. But let us suppose that he does! What would happen then? That is what the Rhapsody ln Black makes us think about.”

It is rare for variations on popular opera themes not to remind us of an alternate version of a familiar subject. But this is no such case. From the very first note, you start to listen to the “story,” and the more you listen, the more it intrigues you. The composer is a master of building up a narrative, and he does not let you get distracted from it for even a second, whether the composition is fast-paced or contemplative. He is also absolutely perfect in “juggling” stylistic contrasts; he draws everything he can out of the piano – by far not every pianist will be ready to take on this musical score, which is daring not only in terms of technical difficulty, but also of ensemble and style. And what brilliant use of the orchestra! It is colorful, richly arranged and brilliantly combined with the piano. This composition has a very bright future, and it would be a wonderful thing to hear it in concert again and again. I sincerely hope that the composer will not only play the Rhapsody himself in concert halls around the world, but that other pianists will also include this composition in their repertoire.[/spoiler]


From Bryansk to the Kremlin. The Nikolai Petrov festival in the Armory Chamber draws to a close 

Eugene Krivitskaya, Culture newspaper

The Musical Kremlin festival, which was held in the Kremlin Armory Museum for the twelfth time, was, as in the past, dedicated primarily to modern pianists. The artistic director of the festival, People’s Artist of the USSR Nikolai Petrov, [regularly] brings together the most talented young pianists from literally all over the world and introduces them to Russian listeners. Thanks to the Culture TV channel, the festival has a large viewership; and this time Musical Kremlin (supported by Gazprombank) also took place in parallel in Bryansk. A formidable group of musicians took over the ancient city for an entire week. Pianists from Russia, Germany, Japan, Israel, and the UK played there. Out of the many events two piano evenings were particularly popular.[spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]…The festival moderator, Peter Tataritsky, who was unchanged from last year, triumphantly announced that a Steinway will always be a Steinway, and the audience was able to hear this for themselves at the concert of Vyacheslav Gryaznov. The very first notes played on the piano made by this company, a partner of Musical Kremlin, demonstrated that in front of our eyes was not only a virtuoso performer, but also an outstanding musician who truly feels the instrument and can draw the most delicate of subtleties out of it. It’s hard to say whether the Russian piano school is “to blame” for this, or Gryaznov’s personal qualities. Probably both factors played a role in turning the piano into a real orchestra that evening. And the program likewise contributed to this metamorphosis as Gryaznov, who is also an alternative pianist, presented his own transcriptions of symphonic scores such as Debussy’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, the Adagietto from Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, and Romeo and Juliet by Tchaikovsky.

Some scores, like the Debussy and the Nocturne from the Borodin Quartet, sounded very natural. Others, like the Tchaikovsky overture, seemed less successful. But as a whole the artist made an overwhelming impression on his audience with his mastery of the instrument and his ability to turn his phenomenal technical skills into ideas and form. Particularly striking was Gryaznov’s almost soundless piano: extraordinarily quiet, though every note was played. The recital program included Gaspard de la Nuit by Ravel, played at the same level of inspiration and with an equally interesting interpretation as the pianist’s own transcriptions. I think that transcriptions have helped Gryaznov in many ways to find his own performing style and progress from the category of “young winner” to the mature master of his art that we saw at the concert of Musical Kremlin.[/spoiler]


The Moscow Philharmonic gives the stage to youth

Angelina Komarova, Novye Izvestia. February 16, 2011

Not long ago we were talking about the sadness of a lost generation of Russian musicians, but not much time has passed and interesting and brilliant young musicians trained in Russia are reappearing on our stages. Various foundations monitor these artists, and from early childhood they receive scholarships and prizes. But the child prodigies grow up, and almost all of them have to face the issue of demand in their profession.

The Moscow Philharmonic is one of the organizations that helps young musicians to feel confident on the professional stage. Many of them get this chance when they are selected for the Philharmonic Debut program, which allows the best of them to perform in the Young Talents subscription series, the most gifted of them then being admitted to the Stars of the XXI Century series.

At this season’s final “Stars” concert in February, two young soloists from the Philharmonic performed – violinist Ivan Pochekin and pianist Vyacheslav Gryaznov. By tradition they were given the stage of the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall and accompanied by a no less high-profile partner, the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra led by its artistic director and principal conductor Maestro Yuri Simonov.

… Gryaznov performed Ravel’s Piano Concerto, written by the composer for his contemporary Paul Wittgenstein, who had lost his right arm during the First World War. The audience is raving about Gryaznov’s distinctive style: he thinks like a composer. He reads the score of someone else’s music as if it were his own. It must be said that Vyacheslav Gryaznov has long been known for his brilliant and inventive piano transcriptions of a variety of pieces of music, and that this talent is no less amazing than his talent as a pianist. One of these transcriptions will soon be performed by the piano duo of Nikolai Petrov and Alexander Ghindin.


Sakhalin’s big dream (an interview)

Elena Stepanskaya, Sakhalin-info
If you ask a resident of Sakhalin which famous countryman he knows, he will confidently say, “Igor Nikolaev!” But who else? He will shrug his shoulders and say: “But there is no one else!”
Believe it or not, now there is. And he is called Vyacheslav Gryaznov.
Just imagine a boy who lived in Lugovoye, went to the Cheburashka kindergarten, studied at Music School No.1, and who is now on tour in Japan, Italy, Denmark, Great Britain, Croatia, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Kuwait, Africa, the Baltic countries, and many Russian cities, performing both solo recitals and with symphony orchestras. Japanese television regularly broadcasts performances by Gryaznov recorded ??in the NHK television studio.
And what do we know about this?
You have to agree, the process of how an ordinary, fun-loving boy turns into a musician is interesting. What does it require? [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]Is it in the genes? The persistence and perseverance of the parents in their desire to get the child to sit at the piano? Sakhalin’s mysterious biofield? The teacher who spots the boy’s talent and has the wherewithal to hand him over to be nurtured by other teachers in Moscow? How can being brought up to be a performer be reconciled with the child’s natural desire to run and jump around? A performer who is a master of his instrument and who finds such a range of emotion in the music of Rachmaninov, Chopin, and Liszt that well-known pieces sound as if they have never been performed before and are, in fact, only just being composed.

Question to Vyacheslav.
What are your most vivid memories of your childhood in Sakhalin?
-The day my parents bought a piano (I was five). An amazing historical role-play and show at a summer camp (the Storming of the Bastille, the execution of Louis XVI) by a history teacher. The village, the tractor I drove (even with passengers). My parents were trying to be farmers and sold potatoes at a cheap price, giving them to pensioners for free. Edvard Grieg’s Piano Concerto performed by my teacher Irina Korzinina. I was greatly impressed! When I was seven, I wrote a patriotic song – it was successfully performed by the choir at the children’s music school, with the composer at the piano. It was even filmed by a TV channel.
– They say that the preschool years set the stage for creativity. Do you remember this period?
– I went to nursery school when I was one year and eight months old. I had a wonderful teacher, with whom my mother had a close relationship. And I was close to her, too! After lessons on rhythmic patterns, I played “music” on the table at lunchtime, for which I was often punished. I also remember Valentina Lobanova, my secondary-school teacher.
There is a widespread view that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart would not have cemented his place in history as a musical genius if it hadn’t been for his father Leopold Mozart, who forced his little Wolfgang to practice round the clock to improve his mastery of the harpsichord and to study the fundamentals of composition. What do your parents, your mother, mean to you?
– She was certainly not like Leopold Mozart. Mostly she just supported me, in the sense that she sacrificed a lot for her ideals to achieve a dream. It was largely her idea to go to Moscow (inspired by the performances of the young pianist Evgeny Kissin, who had gained worldwide fame) so that I could study music more seriously. And, well, my mother is my mother. When we were left alone (my father was killed a year after my admission to the Central Music School of the Moscow Conservatory), my mother, having no Moscow registration, worked at the Central Music School as a janitor and cleaning lady (she was a German teacher) for a ridiculously small amount of money. But as a result we could sleep in the back of the school premises, on the mats in the gym. Renting a room was difficult at first, and we had no relatives in Moscow.
– In October, you returned to Sakhalin for the first time since you left. What had changed?
– Sakhalin had seen improvements, it was better looked after, it had developed and in general was a more attractive place. It was really nice to go back after almost twenty years. I wanted to return. Why? Because I had begun to care about my hometown and the state of affairs there as regards culture and music in particular, and Music School No.1, which I attended as a child (now the Central Music School). I felt I was being drawn back to my roots, with the burning desire to do something for my fellow countrymen.
And as a musician and resident of Sakhalin, what can you do?
– The most important thing that I can do is promote quality music on Sakhalin, to foster high-level performance. In the future, I may set up professional development courses for teachers.
Let’s dream a little and imagine that the Sakhalin region is an icon of culture…
– It’s difficult to talk about icons and ideals. For a start, it would be not only nice but necessary to build a proper concert hall with a decent piano and acoustics suitable for staging symphonic programs and instrumental recitals. We need to purchase a decent piano for the Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Central Music School. As of now there are almost no venues in Sakhalin where proper classical music concerts can be put on. Of course, such projects (training courses, concert halls) require initiative and the help of the municipal administration and the region. I don’t think we would have to wait long to see appreciative Sakhalin residents.

They say that musicians are divided into those who can astound the concert hall and those who can astound the soul. In January 2010, when Vyacheslav Gryaznov comes home to perform two concerts in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk and Kholmsk, we will find out if this saying is right.[/spoiler]


Review by Norihiko Wada (Japan)

Norihiko Wada: composer, pianist
First of all, I was amazed by his incredible abilities and the natural flow of the music. At the same time it is impossible not to appreciate his wide repertoire, which does not focus on a certain time period, his fine taste in his choice of program, and his outstanding ability to organize it.
He doesn’t bluff, nor is there any unnecessary expression or over-action, which young pianists who dream of being a virtuoso can be guilty of. His genuinely meaningful relationship with music is impressive. [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]He adapted well to the piano and perfectly controlled the pedal and sound in view of the acoustic conditions.
I have been the music director of the Kyoto International Music Students Festival, which is held annually in May, for a long time. At this festival talented students from Moscow of Slava’s age always perform. He is not inferior to them, and in fact stands out for his impeccable, calm demeanor on stage, which is replete with objectivity. Any music lover who listens to his performance can tell that he is experienced in the international arena and wants to listen to him again…
Most amazing of all were the Musical Moments by Sergei Rachmaninov. Two years ago I published the edited and proofread version of these scores in Japan. It seems that the works of Rachmaninov are particularly close to Slava. It is well known that for foreigners, including the Japanese, it is very difficult to perform his works. This is in part due to technical difficulties. Rachmaninov, who is called the “Giant of the Piano”, had big hands. And Slava, who fully retains the inherent lyricism of Rachmaninov, performed the music easily and naturally, leaving the audience unaware of its difficulty.
In conclusion, I would like to draw attention to the “Italian Polka” that he performed as an encore. For me this was a pleasant and unexpected find. I really liked his arrangement. And with such a talent I’m sure he will be successful.
It will be interesting to listen to and see him in a few years.[/spoiler]


‘Conquest’ without the help of nuclear warheads (Georgian press)

Rusudan Kutateladze,
Ph.D., Art Critic, Docent of the Tbilisi State Conservatory

While the Second International Piano Competition was being held in Tbilisi in the autumn of 2001, one of the Russian television channels hosted a discussion entitled ”Our Version/Classified Information.” The program was broadcast live. One of the main participants in the discussion was State Duma deputy Aleksei Valentinovich Mitrofanov, who was responsible for issues relating to the mutual relations between member countries of the CIS. The program was so disturbing and, I would say, unprecedented in its openly chauvinistic tendency that it left a deep impression in my memory. […] The strength of a bare fist, the strength of nuclear warheads: that’s what Mitrofanov believes in. That’s what this politician professes! The intent of my remark is not to show the true face of various politicians in Russia but to try to demonstrate that Russia, that Russians are able to speak using an entirely different vocabulary, namely using language that is no less effective…and, most importantly, was first tried out long ago.

What do I have in mind? On the last day of January this year, there was a symphony concert held in the Grand Hall of the V. Saradjishvili Tbilisi State Conservatory featuring the young Russian piano soloist Vyacheslav Gryaznov. The orchestra was directed by the outstanding Georgian conductor Jansug Kakhidze. [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]Russian music was performed. Brilliant compositions of the great Russian composers Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and Mussorgsky stirred Georgian music lovers for the nth time.

The concert program was highly artistic. But the hero of the evening was the nineteen-year-old Moscow pianist Vyacheslav Gryaznov. His name became known to Tbilisi audiences in the autumn of 2001, during the auditions of the Second International Piano Competition. From his very first appearance, Gryaznov attracted everyone’s attention with his heartfelt lyricism, extraordinary technical presence, professional maturity, and, above all, passion for the music. During the first three rounds, Gryaznov was one of the favorites of the competition. However, competitions are always fraught with the unexpected. Gryaznov did not make it to the fourth and final round! The public rose up against the decision of the jury, especially young people, even those participants who themselves had been disqualified along the way. And then the jury took the right decision: they gave Vyacheslav Gryaznov the Audience Favorite award.

The fact that this prize was truly earned, that Gryaznov was remembered by Tbilisi listeners for good reason, was once again confirmed on the evening mentioned above. The concert hall was filled to capacity. The musician received stormy applause. Flowers were brought up on stage. For a young performer, it is very important at the start of his creative career to conquer the hearts of those to whom he addresses his art. I think that Tbilisi will have acquired special significance for Gryaznov as well. Such events are not forgotten!

It is no easy task to perform Rachmaninov’s brilliant Second Piano Concerto. The Tbilisi audience has criteria for evaluation that have developed over time, with a multitude of high-quality examples for comparison rendered by both foreign and Georgian pianists. Gryaznov passed this very complex test with flying colors. His moving performance demonstrated yet again that he is a rising musician who possesses great artistic temperament and refined taste. He is outwardly restrained while imparting a profound emotional experience. His future holds the promise of major achievements!

It was as if the audience were holding its breath out of admiration during the concert. An invisible thread of spirituality and the high aesthetic feelings that give rise to art passed between the stage and the hall. However, there was one moment to which I would like to draw special attention. In response to the unanimous applause, the young musician returned to the piano and his elegant fingers produced a melody at whose first notes the audience literally erupted into applause. He played his own improvisation on a popular song by the well-known Georgian composer Bidzina Kvernadze, ‘”Autumn Flowers.” The hall was captivated! Yes, Georgia and Georgians can be ”conquered” by a Russian. However, it is not by warheads, not by fists, but by spirituality, art and the divine sounds of music.[/spoiler]

Interviews

Interview with Mr. Vyacheslav GRYAZNOV, 6st Prizewinner of the Piano Section at the 3rd SIMC

Interviewed and written by: MASAKI Hiromi (Music Journalist)

Vyacheslav GRYAZNOV (1)At the 3rd Sendai International Music Competition, Mr. Vyacheslav GRYAZNOV won the sixth prize in the Piano Section. During his stay in Japan to give piano lessons at KURASHIKI SAKUYO University, in July 2014 he visited Sendai, where he gave a concert and held an open class for local students learning music as well as participated in a study workshop for volunteer staff of the Sendai International Music Competition. Among the pieces he played in the workshop were Rachmaninov’s Morceaux de fantaisie Op. 3 and Italian Polka arranged by himself. Currently he is teaching at Moscow P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory and the other school, while giving various performances. He has a diverse approach to music, both as a player and as a teacher. We asked him about his current activities and competitions.

— People in Japan might remember you from the NHK BS program “Hi-Vision Classic Club” in 2004 where you played the piano, which was repeatedly broadcast. About seven years have passed since you participated in the Sendai International Music Competition. Please tell us about your current musical activities. [spoiler title=”read more” icon=”arrow”]

I am a soloist of Moscow Philharmonic Society and play recitals and performances with orchestras all over Russia and in other countries. I am also teaching at the Moscow P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Russia and KURASHIKI SAKUYO University in Japan. There are also quite unique and original projects, for example, I recently took part in a piano quartet concert with four pianos at Tchaikovsky Concert Hall, which was organized by a well-known Russian pianist Alexander GHINDIN. The music was arranged by my friends Alexey KURBATOV, Nikita MNDOYANTS (he is one of the finalists in the previous Van Cliburn International Piano Competition) and me. For this event I prepared and arranged the Suite from the opera The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh and the Maiden Fevroniya by Rimsky-Korsakov. I am giving much weight to the arrangement. My piano transcriptions are now being published by German publisher Schott-music. Two new CDs with my transcriptions including Tchaikovsky’s Romeo & Juliet and Debussy’s Pr?lude ? l’apr?s-midi d’un faune are scheduled to be released in Russia.

— What do you think of competitions in general both as a player and as an instructor?

Ideally speaking, competitions should be a place where contestants can demonstrate their ability and quality of their performance to become professional. Successfully attracting the attention of a manager and producer at a competition can pave the way to becoming a high-demanded musician. In fact, there are some young pianists who participate in competitions to earn prize money, but perhaps it is because they have fewer opportunities to give concerts as a soloist. Continuing to play in a competition and playing in a concert as a soloist are two different things.

— In what way?

In a competition, contestants are required to show jury members that they can advance to the next stage by playing in a standard way in a short, limited time, so their individuality and originality might not be appreciated. By contrast, the audience at a concert may want to appreciate a player’s attractive aspects, unique viewpoint and interpretation of music.

— Why did you participate in the Competition in Sendai?

Because I liked piano concertos as assigned repertoires. In the Competition, Contestants are required to play various concertos including those by composers of the classic and romantic schools. In particular, I wanted to take the opportunity to play concertos with a full orchestra or a quartet. At that time I had not so many opportunities to play with an orchestra as I wanted. Even students of Moscow P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory rarely play with an orchestra, except when their instructors invite them to play. Before the Competition I tried to create an opportunity to play Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 with an orchestra in preparation for playing it in the Final Round. I also asked my friends to organize a quartet to practice playing Mozart’s Piano Concerto K449 with me, which I played in the Elimination Round. Competitions require such preparatory work. Thanks to winning the 6th prize in the Competition, I was invited by Sendai City to play Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 3 with the Sendai Philharmonic Orchestra.

Vyacheslav GRYAZNOV (2)

— You mean that you can benefit from the result of a competition and also the process of preparing for it?

Yes, that’s right. Participating in a competition brings many benefits to contestants. Any competition will bring benefits, but especially those that involve many selection procedures increase the contestants’ power of concentration, which, of course, should be improved by preparing before the competition, not during the competition. Another benefit is changing how you perceive music through communication with the conductor.

— I heard that you have kept in touch with volunteers you met during the Sendai International Music Competition.

In Sendai I interacted with other contestants, and I still keep in touch with my host family. The Competition enables contestants who fail to advance to the next round to stay with a local family if they wish, while those who make it to the final stay at a hotel until the end of the Competition. Nevertheless, the host family members came to the venue and encouraged the contestants every time the result of each round was announced. The volunteers’ support was amazing.

Mr. GRYAZNOV continues to stay in touch with the many people he met in the Competition, and often visits Sendai. After the interview, he said, “I would really like to play in Sendai again.” With such commitment, he will no doubt bring Russian pianism to Japan by giving performances and teaching.

http://simc.jp[/spoiler]


Sakhalin’s big dream

Elena Stepanskaya, Sakhalin-info If you ask a resident of Sakhalin which famous countryman he knows, he will confidently say, “Igor Nikolaev!” But who else? He will shrug his shoulders and say: “But there is no one else!” Believe it or not, now there is. And he is called Vyacheslav Gryaznov. Just imagine a boy who lived in Lugovoye, went to the Cheburashka kindergarten, studied at Music School No.1, and who is now on tour in Japan, Italy, Denmark, Great Britain, Croatia, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Kuwait, Africa, the Baltic countries, and many Russian cities, performing both solo recitals and with symphony orchestras. Japanese television regularly broadcasts performances by Gryaznov recorded ??in the NHK television studio. And what do we know about this? You have to agree, the process of how an ordinary, fun-loving boy turns into a musician is interesting. What does it require? [spoiler title=”…read more” icon=”arrow”]Is it in the genes? The persistence and perseverance of the parents in their desire to get the child to sit at the piano? Sakhalin’s mysterious biofield? The teacher who spots the boy’s talent and has the wherewithal to hand him over to be nurtured by other teachers in Moscow? How can being brought up to be a performer be reconciled with the child’s natural desire to run and jump around? A performer who is a master of his instrument and who finds such a range of emotion in the music of Rachmaninov, Chopin, and Liszt that well-known pieces sound as if they have never been performed before and are, in fact, only just being composed. Question to Vyacheslav. – What are your most vivid memories of your childhood in Sakhalin? -The day my parents bought a piano (I was five). An amazing historical role-play and show at a summer camp (the Storming of the Bastille, the execution of Louis XVI) by a history teacher. The village, the tractor I drove (even with passengers). My parents were trying to be farmers and sold potatoes at a cheap price, giving them to pensioners for free. Edvard Grieg’s Piano Concerto performed by my teacher Irina Korzinina. I was greatly impressed! When I was seven, I wrote a patriotic song – it was successfully performed by the choir at the children’s music school, with the composer at the piano. It was even filmed by a TV channel. – They say that the preschool years set the stage for creativity. Do you remember this period? – I went to nursery school when I was one year and eight months old. I had a wonderful teacher, with whom my mother had a close relationship. And I was close to her, too! After lessons on rhythmic patterns, I played “music” on the table at lunchtime, for which I was often punished. I also remember Valentina Lobanova, my secondary-school teacher. – There is a widespread view that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart would not have cemented his place in history as a musical genius if it hadn’t been for his father Leopold Mozart, who forced his little Wolfgang to practice round the clock to improve his mastery of the harpsichord and to study the fundamentals of composition. What do your parents, your mother, mean to you? – She was certainly not like Leopold Mozart. Mostly she just supported me, in the sense that she sacrificed a lot for her ideals to achieve a dream. It was largely her idea to go to Moscow (inspired by the performances of the young pianist Evgeny Kissin, who had gained worldwide fame) so that I could study music more seriously. And, well, my mother is my mother. When we were left alone (my father was killed a year after my admission to the Central Music School of the Moscow Conservatory), my mother, having no Moscow registration, worked at the Central Music School as a janitor and cleaning lady (she was a German teacher) for a ridiculously small amount of money. But as a result we could sleep in the back of the school premises, on the mats in the gym. Renting a room was difficult at first, and we had no relatives in Moscow. – In October, you returned to Sakhalin for the first time since you left. What had changed? – Sakhalin had seen improvements, it was better looked after, it had developed and in general was a more attractive place. It was really nice to go back after almost twenty years. I wanted to return. Why? Because I had begun to care about my hometown and the state of affairs there as regards culture and music in particular, and Music School No.1, which I attended as a child (now the Central Music School). I felt I was being drawn back to my roots, with the burning desire to do something for my fellow countrymen. – And as a musician and resident of Sakhalin, what can you do? – The most important thing that I can do is promote quality music on Sakhalin, to foster high-level performance. In the future, I may set up professional development courses for teachers. – Let’s dream a little and imagine that the Sakhalin region is an icon of culture… – It’s difficult to talk about icons and ideals. For a start, it would be not only nice but necessary to build a proper concert hall with a decent piano and acoustics suitable for staging symphonic programs and instrumental recitals. We need to purchase a decent piano for the Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Central Music School. As of now there are almost no venues in Sakhalin where proper classical music concerts can be put on. Of course, such projects (training courses, concert halls) require initiative and the help of the municipal administration and the region. I don’t think we would have to wait long to see appreciative Sakhalin residents.

They say that musicians are divided into those who can astound the concert hall and those who can astound the soul. In January 2010, when Vyacheslav Gryaznov comes home to perform two concerts in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk and Kholmsk, we will find out if this saying is right.

http://sakhalin.info [/spoiler]More interviews in Russian